Underground Recovery, LLC Granted Patent for Innovative Process that Generates Electricity from Coal and Other Fossil Fuels without Carbon Emissions

Fossil fuels like coal, oil and natural gas have been, are, and will remain some of the most abundant energy sources in the world, especially in the US. Despite the benefits of fossil fuel recovery — such as underground coal mining and combustion, and oil and natural gas drilling — and above-ground combustion for power plants, both historically present a threat to the environment and produce undesirable carbon dioxide emissions, greenhouse gas, and ash.

Coal is integral to many of the US’s state economies and is an industry these states can’t afford to lose. Coal is particularly plentiful in Kentucky; as of 2012, coal generates 41% of the world’s electricity, and in 2013, coal generated 93% of all Kentucky’s electricity. Kentucky is the third largest producer of coal in the US, and one of the largest exporters of coal to Asian markets.

Many projects in various stages of commercialization are under way to either process the above-ground released carbon dioxide or sequester underground carbon dioxide, all adding to the cost and environmental impact of generating additional electricity. However, the Lexington-based research and development company Underground Recovery, LLC has a reasonable solution for retrieving underground fossil fuels.

Since 2011, Underground Recovery has been devoted to environmentally friendly and cost effective recovery of energy and metals from underground resources. The company was granted a US patent in July for its innovative coal combustion process, which can eliminate atmospheric release of carbon dioxide emissions and ash. This new process may be a tremendous boon to coal industries in Kentucky and throughout the world, as it provides an economically feasible alternative to the current process of coal, oil, and natural gas mining, followed by above ground combustion and power generation with subsequent under- and above-ground carbon sequestration.

As a high-risk project, if viable, a successful implementation of this process, especially when coupled with hydraulic fracturing, can be ”game changing “ by lowering costs of energy environmental development, increasing fossil fuel reserves, and minimizing the negative environmental impacts of the atmospheric release of GHG, like CO2 and ash.

Developed and Written by Dr. Subodh Das

July 28, 2014

Phinix LLC

Copyright 2013. All rights Reserved by Phinix, LLC.

www.phinix.net    skdas@phinix.net

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“White House touts energy policies as rules loom” – Associated Press, 30 May 2014

With continued backlash, President Obama is still trying to sell the US on his new energy policy and attempting to showcase the regulations as economically advantageous through job creation, cleaner energy sources, and protection of the US against foreign turmoil. In a 42-page report to be released on Thursday, the White House contends that the US’s natural gas boon is both economically and environmentally beneficial.

The report’s purpose is to counteract the disapproval of the EPA‘s new regulations on coal-fired power plants, which many expect will inflate electricity costs, thwart job growth, and impede economic prosperity. Conservatives and their allies believe that reducing emissions won’t actually aid the environment, and only become a hinderance to the economy.

The White House reports argues that increased domestic energy production, wind and solar power, and decreased dependency on oil have largely bolstered the security of US energy and the economy, and speak directly to the impacts of climate change by reducing carbon emissions.

The US’s upswing in natural gas safeguards the economy, and everyone’s pockets, if oil-producing countries undergo turmoil and cause oil prices to skyrocket. If we continue to produce energy sources domestically, then the US reaps the benefits—that means more money and more jobs.

Regardless, the US is still the number one consumer and importer of oil. The advent of natural gas hasn’t been embraced by everyone—the process of extracting natural gas from shale rock presents some unease with many environmental groups. The decline in oil consumption started in 2006, though that fall is ascribed to the recession. At the same time, natural gas consumption has increased by 18% since 2005.

Developed and Written by Dr. Subodh Das and Tara Mahadevan

May 30, 2014

Phinix LLC

Copyright 2014. All rights Reserved by Phinix, LLC.

www.phinix.net    skdas@phinix.net

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“Exxon Presses for Exports” – 11 December 2013, Wall Street Journal

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Wall Street Journal

According to Exxon Mobil’s annual energy outlook, in the following decades, the world’s rising need for oil and energy will be met by ample amounts of petroleum sourced both in the US and globally. Exxon is asking the US to end embargoes on crude exports, which were originally created during the Arab oil embargo of 1973. The oil giant believes that the nation is now generating enough crude to become an exporter.

The US’s abundant amounts of oil have created some issues for Exxon and many energy companies: increased production has flooded US demand, causing domestic prices to decrease and gnawing at energy companies’ profits. The US doesn’t allow crude to be exported to other countries, except Canada; however, the government will soon allow natural gas to be exported through terminals to countries that don’t have free-trade agreements with the US.

Exxon’s outlook states that, by 2015, more oil will be tapped in North America than from Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), excluding Saudi Arabia. However, by 2040, Exxon foreshadows that OPEC will produce 45% of the world’s petroleum. Exxon’s outlook predicts that the world will use 35% more energy in 2040 than 2010, stemming from growing incomes and populations in developing countries like India and China. Exxon also predicts that oil and gas will supply 60% of energy used in 2040. Exxon’s projections are optimistic, noting that 65% of the world’s crude will remain untouched in 2040.

Lifting this embargo might be met with opposition, as consumers worry that crude exports can lead to rising US gas prices, and environmentalists worry about the environmental consequences of enlarged production. Exxon’s outlook reinforces the split between those who promote fossil fuel emission limits, and those — like Exxon — who deem such limits as impractical.

Exxon believes that coal will be mostly forced out by natural gas by 2030. By 2040, sources of gas, from materials like shale rock, will make up one third of the world’s energy.

As guardians of the free-trade market and pragmatism, we believe that US oil companies should be allowed to export (and import) oil and any other energy sources.

Developed and Written by Dr. Subodh Das and Tara Mahadevan

January 2, 2014

Phinix LLC

Copyright 2014. All rights Reserved by Phinix, LLC.

www.phinix.net    skdas@phinix.net

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