“UBC recycling rate stands at 66.7 percent” – Recycling Today, 30 September 2014

Together, the Aluminum Association, the Can Manufacturers Institute, and the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries have reported that 2013′s used aluminum beverage can recycling rate hit 66.7 percent. This marks the third year in a row that the US recycling rate has surpassed 65 percent.

According to the Aluminum Association, the US’s Used Beverage Cans (UBC) recycling rate from the previous decade only averaged 54 percent. The Aluminum Association notes that the UBC recycling rate has grown in the last decade because US recyclers have been importing used cans from Canada, Mexico, and Saudi Arabia, amongst other countries. Due to the US’s closed-loop recycling process, the imported UBCs bolster the US’s recycling stream.

In 2012, the amount of imported cans declined; however, in the same year, US consumers recycled more cans, so the numbers balanced out.

Aluminum Association — Sustainability Facts
Can Manufacturers Institute — Beverage Can Facts

Can Manufacturers Institute — Recycling & Sustainability
Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries — White Papers, Reports, and Analysis

Developed and Written by Dr. Subodh Das and Tara Mahadevan

October 6, 2014

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www.phinix.net    skdas@phinix.net

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“White House touts energy policies as rules loom” – Associated Press, 30 May 2014

With continued backlash, President Obama is still trying to sell the US on his new energy policy and attempting to showcase the regulations as economically advantageous through job creation, cleaner energy sources, and protection of the US against foreign turmoil. In a 42-page report to be released on Thursday, the White House contends that the US’s natural gas boon is both economically and environmentally beneficial.

The report’s purpose is to counteract the disapproval of the EPA‘s new regulations on coal-fired power plants, which many expect will inflate electricity costs, thwart job growth, and impede economic prosperity. Conservatives and their allies believe that reducing emissions won’t actually aid the environment, and only become a hinderance to the economy.

The White House reports argues that increased domestic energy production, wind and solar power, and decreased dependency on oil have largely bolstered the security of US energy and the economy, and speak directly to the impacts of climate change by reducing carbon emissions.

The US’s upswing in natural gas safeguards the economy, and everyone’s pockets, if oil-producing countries undergo turmoil and cause oil prices to skyrocket. If we continue to produce energy sources domestically, then the US reaps the benefits—that means more money and more jobs.

Regardless, the US is still the number one consumer and importer of oil. The advent of natural gas hasn’t been embraced by everyone—the process of extracting natural gas from shale rock presents some unease with many environmental groups. The decline in oil consumption started in 2006, though that fall is ascribed to the recession. At the same time, natural gas consumption has increased by 18% since 2005.

Developed and Written by Dr. Subodh Das and Tara Mahadevan

May 30, 2014

Phinix LLC

Copyright 2014. All rights Reserved by Phinix, LLC.

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“Aluminum Probe Focuses on Costs to Users” – Wall Street Journal, 13 August 2013

We previously reported on Goldman Sachs and JPMorgan Chase’s expensive aluminum storing and delivery practices, which, in August, were called into question by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC), an independent agency of the federal government that regulates futures and option markets.

The CFTC believes that some Wall Street Banks have falsely inflated the prices of aluminum and other metals stored in their facilities, in order to make a buck (or well over a buck) from end users and consumers. The CFTC sent subpoenas to firms like JPMorgan and Goldman — as well as Goldman’s aluminum and metal storing facility Metro International Trade Services — requiring them to present recordings of their commodities operations from January 2010 and onward.

The firms developed a habit of shuffling their stores of aluminum, and holding on to them longer, in order to inflate prices; the additional time increased storage costs that are included in the aluminum price when delivered. The London Metal Exchange, which is in charge of creating pricing regulations, approved some of the firms’ warehouses that were subpoenaed.

Wall Street’s association with commodity and energy markets is being closely examined. Before the 1980′s, banking institutions weren’t allowed to own non-financial businesses — Congress wanted to reduce the risks banks take, as well as safeguard depositors. However, after the 1990′s, Congress and the Federal Reserve allowed some banks to develop businesses in storing and transporting commodities.

Both JPMorgan and Goldman have denied the allegations, maintaining that customers don’t face a wait time, and would receive shipments immediately. They also noted that delayed deliveries were due to client orders and not the firms themselves.

Time to move buying, selling and pricing back to inventory decisions, basing the metal market upon true market supply and demand from actual producers and consumers, rather than speculators and investment bankers.

Developed and Written by Dr. Subodh Das and Tara Mahadevan

September 25, 2013

Phinix LLC

Copyright 2013. All rights Reserved by Phinix, LLC.

www.phinix.net    skdas@phinix.net

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